Textile

The JY Textiles team include a Textile Technologist who is responsible for the quality of fabrics and fillings ensuring only the very best quality components are used and this is reflected in the finished product. Read More Originally set up to manufacture wool based products for the Australian market, JY Textiles have now developed and fillings currently used are cotton, wool, silk, camel, cashmere, microfiber, soya and bamboo. Our production unit is set up to make top quality products, primarily using single needle quilt machines with large emphasis being placed on QC inspection. In addition to this JY Textiles also have the capability to do mass market products on multi needle machinery with the same level of attention to quality being applied to this ensuring customers only receive top quality finished products. JY Textiles head office which is based in Shanghai is within easy reach of the Bund and also has a small showroom ideal for clients basing themselves in the city. All communications are dealt with through our Shanghai office where English speaking staff are available enabling trouble free communication. Our production unit and showroom is in a modern 3 story factory based in Tong Xiang City, 2 hours drive from Shanghai which is ideally located to allow the company to utilize the expertise of the many local workers who have extensive experience in the textile industry. The JY Textiles name is about quality, the whole team are dedicated to ensuring that the products our customers receive are simply the best from development through to delivery.

Nope, Vikings didn’t teach Inuit ancestors to weave

Arts of Armenia-Textiles The serious study of Armenian textiles is still in its infancy. There are scattered monographs and catalogues on Armenian carpets [ , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ], lace and embroidery [ , , , , , , ], cloth fragments preserved in manuscript bindings [ , , , ], ecclesiastical vestments [ , ], altar curtains [ , , ], and clothing [ ]. However, not one of the rich textile collections in the Armenian monasteries in Etchmiadzin, Jerusalem, Venice, Vienna, and elsewhere is graced by a catalogue or complete inventory.

The complex history of Armenian weaving and needlework was acted out in the Near East, a vast, ancient and ethnically diverse region. Few are the people who, like the Armenians, can boast of a continuous and consistent record of fine textile production from the first millenium B. Armenians today are blessed by the diversity and richness of a textile heritage passed on by thirty centuries of diligent practice; yet they are burdened by the pressure to keep alive a tradition nearly destroyed in , and subverted by a technology that condemns handmade fabrics to museums and lets machines produce perfect, but lifeless cloth.

The study of the history of clothing and textiles traces the availability and use of textiles and other materials and the development of technology for the making of clothing over human history. The wearing of clothing is exclusively a human characteristic and is a feature of most human societies.

Undergraduate team helps to develop drone-based intro robotics course August 17, Michele Hayeur Smith’s research on textiles spanning the North Atlantic region has been supported by three major grants from the National Science Foundation’s Arctic Social Science Program. The finding, made possible in part by a new method for dating fiber artifacts contaminated with oil, is evidence of independent, homegrown indigenous fiber technology rather than a transfer of knowledge from Viking settlers.

Co-authored with Kevin P. Here, Hayeur Smith and Smith discuss the study , published in Journal of Archaeological Science, and what it means for understanding the history of the high Canadian Arctic. What was the impetus for undertaking this study? I am a specialist in Norse textiles, and I was researching the production and circulation of textiles from the Viking age to the 19th century. I started this project because it came to my attention that there were huge collections of pre-modern textiles in Iceland, which is where I started out.

I was also interested in looking at women. Textiles happen to be a very gendered activity in Norse society — men had no involvement whatsoever with it. In Iceland, it became very important because it was a form of currency for almost years: Everything was based on the value of cloth. I eventually expanded my research to the rest of the North Atlantic to see what was going on in the other Norse colonies in terms of textiles.

There were some fragments of cloth and yarn that had been found in the Canadian High Arctic, and there was an assumption that it came from the Norse. I went through the collections at Canadian Museum of History — a sizeable collection of pieces of yarn that had been claimed to be Norse.

Textile

The find provides the earliest evidence of a plant-based dye in Israel. According to the researchers, the metalworkers were probably entitled to wear colorful clothing as a mark of their high status Evidence of the use of plant dyes from the time of King Solomon has been recovered. Excavations conducted since in the Timna Valley and directed by Dr.

The textiles date to the early Iron Age 12th — 10th centuries BCE , the time of the biblical kings David and Solomon and some are decorated with a red-and-blue bands pattern. These are the earliest examples of plant-based dyes in the country and in the Levant the Eastern Mediterranean.

RUTH BARNES Ruth Barnes Department of Indo-Pacific Art Yale University Art Gallery Textiles Curator, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford b Early Indonesian Textiles: Scientific Dating in a Wider Contest. In Barnes, Ruth and Mary H. Kahlenberg (eds.).

Dyes for textiles productlist – Chemotex – 2 – Introduction Our purpose is to develop and successfully market innovative products for the textile industry. Natural textiles provide suitable material for radiocarbon dating. Short-lived organic matter is usually involved and, if 14C dating is applied to pieces that are stylistically well dated, a better understanding of 14C dating of this type of material can be gained. This study presents some examples of dating that support the stylistic dates.

Repeated analyses illustrate the robustness of the standard treatment applied to the textiles. The very first indication of fiber use was reported from archaeological sites as old as 30 ka BP Kvavadze Other archaeological finds suggest that weaving has been known from the very early days of anatomically modern humans Bar-Yosef Made of perishable organic material, very old textiles are extremely unique and preserved under special climatic and geochemical conditions Good Nevertheless, ages as old as 9 ka BP have been obtained on old charred fragments found in the Far East Kuzmin et al.

Dancing Spirit Black by Colleen Wallace

On-line database for 14C-dated textiles from early times until the end of 1rst millennium AD Overview and easy access First of all it wants to give an overview on as well as easy access to reliably dated textiles from the 1st millennium BC and AD. This, actually, is a desideratum, since during the last decades, quite a number of textiles have been radiocarbon dated. However, the places of publication of these results frequently are rather hard to locate and only known to those who ordered or undertook the analyses.

Textile Evidence Supports Skewed Radiocarbon Date of Shroud of Turin Carbon (C) dating of a corner section of the cloth produced dates ranging from to A.D.(1) This paper presents new evidence demonstrating that it is highly Textile Evidence Supports Skewed Radiocarbon Date of .

I chose practice-led research as my research method because I was not familiar with the industrial production and constructions of clipped designs. By creative practicing I gained a deeper under-standing and new insights into the technique of floating and clipping. The creation of an idea port-folio by using various sketching methods and the development of the designs for production, represent an instrument in this research. In this study, creative activity meets theoretical background.

The idea portfolio supports the dialogue between the designer and the technician in a design case in collaboration with the Italian weaving mill Lodetex. A little bit of luck contributed to the final outcome of this study as well. At an early point of my study, I wanted to discuss the material and col-our design of woven textiles. I considered various ways on how to approach the subject from a fresh and meaningful point of view.

In the beginning of the spring of , I spent three months on an internship at the Italian weaving mill Lodetex. Lodetex is specialized in the production of jacquard fabrics for furnishing markets.

Textile Analysis

Charles Arthur traces the reason for the change in fortune and looks at the situation for workers who still have jobs. The main activity in the FTZs was assembly production, and, during the s, the number of people employed in assembly manufacturing rose from 16, to nearly , A typical garment factory in the Dominican Republic Photo:

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Inside UNM Textiles and rope fragments found in a Peruvian cave have been dated to around 12, years ago, making them the oldest textiles ever found in South America, according to a report in the April issue of Current Anthropology. Edward Jolie, the lead author of the article, is a graduate student at UNM as well as an archaeologist at Mercyhurst College.

The items were found 30 years ago in Guitarrero Cave high in the Andes Mountains. Other artifacts found along with the textiles had been dated to 12, ago and even older. However, the textiles themselves had never been dated, and whether they too were that old had been controversial, according to Jolie. The cave had been disturbed frequently by human and geological activity, so it was possible that the textiles could have belonged to much more recent inhabitants.

What’s more, the prior radiocarbon dates for the site had been taken from bone, obsidian, and charcoal—items that are known to sometimes produce inaccurate radiocarbon ages. According to Jolie, charcoal especially can produce dates that tend to overestimate a site’s age.

Accelerator radiocarbon dating of art,textiles, and artifacts

The study shows that the ancient Arctic peoples developed yarn spinning technology independently. Brown University A new study by Brown University researchers shows that the Dorset and Thule people—ancestors of today’s Inuit—created spun yarn some to 1, years before Vikings arrived in North America. The finding, made possible in part by a new method for dating fiber artifacts contaminated with oil, is evidence of independent, homegrown indigenous fiber technology rather than a transfer of knowledge from Viking settlers.

The Textiles Library is the home to world-class collections in the fields of polymer and color chemistry, textile engineering, nonwovens, biomedical textiles, supply chain management, fashion merchandising, apparel management, and design.

Carbon Dating Identifies South America’s Oldest Textiles April 12, Textiles and rope fragments found in a Peruvian cave have been dated to around 12, years ago, making them the oldest textiles ever found in South America, according to a report in the April issue of Current Anthropology. The items were found 30 years ago in Guitarrero Cave high in the Andes Mountains. Other artifacts found along with the textiles had been dated to 12, ago and even older.

However, the textiles themselves had never been dated, and whether they too were that old had been controversial, according to Edward Jolie, an archaeologist at Mercyhurst College PA who led this latest research. The cave had been disturbed frequently by human and geological activity, so it was possible that the textiles could have belonged to much more recent inhabitants.

His team used the latest radiocarbon dating technique—accelerated mass spectrometry—to place the textiles at between 12, and 11, years old. The textile items include fragments of woven fabrics possibly used for bags, wall or floor coverings, or bedding. These early mountain forays set the stage for the permanent settlements that came later—after 11, years ago—when the climate had warmed, glaciers receded, and settlers had a chance to adapt to living at higher altitudes.

The Elusive Obsoletes

Radiocarbon Dating Bibliography Links Contact Imprint Bibliography The following bibliography gives You all the referenced titles which appear in Textile List in a short version only quoted as author’s name and year of print in its total length following the DAIs full-citation system. Aubert — Cortopassi M. Exhibition catalogue Paris Paris

Original function of the textiles and dating were re-attributed where necessary. Once the technical information was recorded, the textiles were photographed by Emily Taylor. A general shot of front and back was taken, an arrow included to indicate the direction of the warp of the fabric.

The Shroud of Turin – Evidence it is authentic Below is a summary of scientific and historical evidence supporting the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin as the ancient burial cloth of the historical Jesus of Nazareth. Michael Fischer, adapted from the original article by John C. These dimensions correlate with ancient measurements of 2 cubits x 8 cubits – consistent with loom technology of the period.

The finer weave of 3-over-1 herringbone is consistent with the New Testament statement that the “sindon” or shroud was purchased by Joseph of Arimathea, who was a wealthy man. In , there was a fire in the church in Chambery, France, where the Shroud was being kept. Part of the metal storage case melted and fell on the cloth, leaving burns, and efforts to extinguish the fire left water stains. Yet the image of the man was hardly touched.

Textiles, Carpets and Costumes

Originally appeared in Shroud News, Issue No. Garza-Valdes and his colleagues 7 show that the isotopic and chemical composition of carbon in linen fabric can be modified by natural processes other than radioactive decay. Such processes were noted earlier by Wigley-Muller 8. Although the results by Kouznetsov have been negatively evaluated by Jull, et al, of the Arizona AMS laboratory 9 our own work confirms the results of the statistical evaluation and suggests that the content of 14C may not be the same over the whole surface of the Shroud.

Sources available for the study of clothing and textiles include material remains discovered via archaeology; representation of textiles and their manufacture in art; and documents concerning the manufacture, acquisition, use, and trade of fabrics, tools, and finished garments.

Etymology[ edit ] The word ‘textile’ is from Latin , from the adjective textilis, meaning ‘woven’, from textus, the past participle of the verb texere, ‘to weave’. History of clothing and textiles The first clothes, worn at least 70, years ago and perhaps much earlier, were probably made of animal skins and helped protect early humans from the ice ages. Then at some point people learned to weave plant fibers into textiles. The discovery of dyed flax fibres in a cave in the Republic of Georgia dated to 34, BCE suggests textile-like materials were made even in prehistoric times.

However, for the main types of textiles, plain weave , twill , or satin weave , there is little difference between the ancient and modern methods. Uses[ edit ] Textiles have an assortment of uses, the most common of which are for clothing and for containers such as bags and baskets. In the household they are used in carpeting , upholstered furnishings , window shades , towels , coverings for tables, beds, and other flat surfaces, and in art.

In the workplace they are used in industrial and scientific processes such as filtering.

BMA to show off world-renowned textile collection